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Eagle-headed Protective Genie by FalseMaria Eagle-headed Protective Genie by FalseMaria
Assyrian circa 860 BC
Marble relief carving


British Museum London.
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:icontuam:
Tuam Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2013
Beautiful carving. It serves for study. Thanks.
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:iconfalsemaria:
FalseMaria Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2013
welcome.:)
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:iconishakov:
IshakoV Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013
Yes this is Nisroch our god of agriculture and plantation I am assyrian and you don't see people like me to often I belong to a family clan we speak Aramaic and study our origins we are mostly Christian but we always stick close to our blood name
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:iconfalsemaria:
FalseMaria Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013
Thanks for the information about this.
Nice to meet you :handshake:
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:icondutchshun:
dutchshun Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2012
Although sculptured stone, I like the embossed effect of the detail really bringing the history alive. :)
Wonderful natural tones too.
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:iconfalsemaria:
FalseMaria Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2012
Thanks....these carvings are incredible.
Thanks for faving too.:)
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:iconenkiannunaki:
EnkiAnnunaki Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2012
I Belive that's a pineal gland in his hand . . . tell me it isn't so . . . doesn't that look like a sectional view of the thyroid ?
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:iconfalsemaria:
FalseMaria Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2012
Okay I will tell you its not so.:)
Its a pine cone..... its a symbol of fertility.Like you mentioned before ,these genies are often depicted standing in front of a sacred tree with cone raised in the act of pollination.
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:iconenkiannunaki:
EnkiAnnunaki Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2012
Excellent detail close-up. I must find the rest of it
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:iconfalsemaria:
FalseMaria Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2012
Thanks ..I love this one too.
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:iconundefinedreference:
undefinedreference Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2011
Assur is pretty hot in new age circles. Death meets death.
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:iconfalsemaria:
FalseMaria Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2011
Thanks for the warning.:p
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:iconundefinedreference:
undefinedreference Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2011
Also it is said that human civilization started in Mesopotamia. Which is probably true if civilization is defined by the amount of cut rock a society leaves behind. I find your fascination for it both intriguing and unsettling. Because you fascination obviously is a very deep one. You live and breathe it, it seems.
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:iconfalsemaria:
FalseMaria Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2011
heheh..I wouldn't quite put it that strongly.
Its just that I am fascinated by ancient civilisations and their mythology and "Fairytales" (for the want of a better word).How mankind has explained his place within it all..and the creativity that has gone along with it.

Now why do you find my interest in such things to be unsettling?:hmm:
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:iconundefinedreference:
undefinedreference Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2011
Btw shepherds LOVE Paganini! :)
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:iconundefinedreference:
undefinedreference Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2011
Actually it's those rocks and what they stand for (enslavement, oppression) that unsettle me. But needless to say that your fascination for them takes the viewer infinitely deeper into the matter than the average tourist brochure does (in fact perhaps your talent for doing so is in itself a bit scary as well). I'm from shepherds (the scum) and we don't think too much about the human agglomerations called cities and the great cultures therein, at least not while they don't come with a degree of justice, which they usually don't. I believe in a cut-rock-less world.
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:iconfalsemaria:
FalseMaria Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2011
Hmm...I suppose you could look it as enslavement and oppression...or you could look at it as an attempt by these early cultures to try to explain "what its all about".Its Art.
I don't think you can apply modern standards of thinking about freedom and peoples rights to these Ancient cultures.
Here is a sweeping statement...I think all great Art until relatively recently has been built on the back of oppression and enslavement.
Doesn't stop it being awesome...but just cause you appreciate its beauty doesn't mean you condone how it was produced.
Man has always been and always will be mean to his fellow man..if you are not part of the little "chosen" group.We have not evolved to live in huge communities...they recon that living in communities of more than a hundred or so individuals brings out the worst in human nature.
I live in the countryside too..and Nature is way by far the best artist.

Like many artists and musicians , Pagannini was dependent on Royalty and the rich for patronage.
His music is still pretty damn good though.:)
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:iconundefinedreference:
undefinedreference Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2011
You wrote: "I don't think you can apply modern standards of thinking about freedom and peoples rights to these Ancient cultures." In my opinion this is a common misconception. Throughout human history there have always been individuals and groups of individuals who were damn well aware of freedom and their rights. The Frysians or the ancient Hebrews to name some. But that is a very big issue, perhaps better some other time..

I don't think the Egyptian or Assyrian rock carvers saw their work as art. To them creating those things probably was an act of worship, or at most a craft and a great job to have.

Indeed much of what we know as culture, like art and (Western) philosophy and even science, has been devised for no other reason than to confirm the powers that be. That's how the polis works. For disambiguation: the Greek philosophers were "againsters" and weren't part of this, and identifying ancient Greek society with its philosophers is an insult to the latter. I was once told that the mental frame behind Greek philosophy stems from shepherds:)

I didn't mean to dispute the beauty. Beauty is a very strange thing. An F15 is built to kill and destroy, yet it is beautiful at the same time. The same can of course be said about many a medieval sword. I do definitely see the beauty in itself here. But it also somewhat unsettles me to look at these things, which is what I tried to explain.

I live right on the edge of the town/countryside btw, as I have most of my life. Yes, the country part surely is the nicer one to look at:)
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:iconfalsemaria:
FalseMaria Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2011
I can't say I know anything about the Frysians.:( Were they a Celtic type group?
The Ancient Hebrews ,like all ancient peoples ,kept slaves as well.
As you allude to,Ancient Greece is held up as some kind of lost ancient Democracy which of course it wasn't . Democracy?..tell that to the women and the slaves.:p
What I was trying to say is that with increasing urbanisation in Ancient times...the Super Powers as it were ..the Assyrians and the Persians and the Egyptians etc..comes increasing shitting on your fellow man.So ,it is "easier" for a more agrarian culture to seem more "fair".But the Art of these Ancient Super Powers is impressive . Where is the Frysian Art?
I do understand what you mean when you say that you find them unsettling though.


Now we get into the discussion about what constitutes Art.
Sure ,these carvings and monuments have a religious basis,but that doesn't mean that it can't be classed as Art.Humans like to create things.Some do it better than others.What makes you think that these masons and carvers didn't get a creative buzz out of what they did? Its only until relatively recently that artists have had a free reign to "do their own thing".Up until this point artists were employed by a rich person...royalty or the Church or the Medicis or some other abuser of power.They kind of had to produce what they were "told to " or what was "acceptable" or face the consequences and starve.

I have lived in both city and countryside. I much prefer the countryside.:)
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(1 Reply)
:iconundefinedreference:
undefinedreference Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2011
[continued] Or the people of the South of France, who were brutally subdued by the Parisians after the latter had decided that the Provence best be made part of the French territory. In my opinion it would be a posthumous insult to those murdered to state that one cannot apply modern standards of thinking about freedom and peoples rights to what the Parisians did. A crime is a crime is a crime.

Note that this story is surrounded by another misconception, namely that the Church declared the people of the South heretics and hired the Parisians to fight them. It was exactly the other way around. In this and many such cases, including the witch hunts during the "Renaissance", the Church has been reluctant to go along, at least initially (i.e. before the "difficult" bishops had been replaced). And the Church has apologized for it in the person of Pope John Paul II, but I don't think the Parisians have yet. I am not a believer, but I do believe in giving credit to who deserves it.
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:iconyudaev:
Yudaev Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
power of eternity
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:iconfalsemaria:
FalseMaria Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011
These carvings just blow me away.:heart:
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:icondouglashumphries:
DouglasHumphries Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2011
..very striking detail.
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:iconfalsemaria:
FalseMaria Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2011
:)
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:iconamoxes:
amoxes Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
Nice posting!
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:iconfalsemaria:
FalseMaria Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2011
Thanks :)
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April 14, 2011
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